3-24-20 Community Update

3-24-20

Dear STEM K-8 Families:

I hope this note finds you surviving.  Our family lives are turned upside down and we’re navigating a landscape that shifts daily.  The Governor’s shelter in place order highlighted the seriousness of our circumstances and emphasizes a reality many of us were already living. The health, economic, and social pain is real and going to get worse. Let’s have our STEM community be defined by compassion and support for one another (along with adherence to social distancing guidelines).  Many staff share the confusing reality of fortunate families with jobs—how to work at home while caring for and educating multiple children.  We face rigorous challenges and numerous constraints.  That’s what STEM is supposed to be about!

WA State, SPS, and STEM K-8 Staff are scrambling to deal with an extended shut down.  The first priority is supporting safety and basic needs for families and staff. The epidemiology of Covid-19 points towards the likelihood of a longer rather than shorter closure. STEM staff are starting to explore what extending educational services in a pandemic means.  We are trying to anticipate coming changes while working within guidance from a large system.  We know we to have to figure out how to reach with families with limited access to technology and the Internet, and different capacities to support learning at home. We know that jumping in is going to generate numerous pitfalls and mistakes, and that’s the basis for learning and growing. I am not going to duplicate SPS communications.

You and your children are in our minds, and the focus of our scrambling efforts.

We will work our way through this together.

Ben Ostrom

STEM Principal

 

3-18-20 Family Update-Resources

 

Dear STEM K-8 Families:

You all are on my mind!  We are all trying to figure out how to survive dramatic changes to family needs, work (or out of work) routines, and social upheaval.  Make sure the new structures you set up for yourselves and your children include taking breaks from the news, and figuring out how to get outside for physical activity while keeping your distance from others.  Seattle Public Schools continues to try to catch up with the extraordinary pace of changes to get a grip on supporting families and learning.

SPS is communicating with families directly. I will try not to repeat that here. I’m contributing a list of resources for both learning and support that may be useful.

We will rise to the extraordinary crisis we are facing. STEM is about tackling challenges; we were made for this.

We will figure our way through this together!

Ben Ostrom,

STEM Principal

Immediate support for families:

  1. School sites with weekly meals for all student 11am-1pm Monday to Friday. There are 26 meal sites total. These sites will be a hub for resources (more info soon!). The three West Seattle and Southwest School Sites

Concord International Elementary School (Google map)
723 S Concord St Seattle, WA 98108

Enter and exit through doors facing Concord Street of enclosed hallway connecting cafeteria and main building. Cafeteria will be immediately to the left upon entry.

Denny International Middle School (Google map)
2601 SW Kenyon St Seattle, WA 98126

Enter and exit through galleria doors on either south or north side of building.

Chief Sealth International High School (Google map)
2600 SW Thistle St Seattle, WA 98126

Enter and exit through galleria doors on either south or north side of building.

West Seattle Elementary School (Google map)
6760 34th Ave SW Seattle, WA 98126

Enter and exit through main entrance on north side of building. After taking a right, the lunchroom will be on the left.

West Seattle High School (Google map)
3000 California Ave SW Seattle, WA 98116

Enter and exit through courtyard doors on

 

  1. Financial Resources for Washington Residents Impacted by COVID-19

https://dfi.wa.gov/coronavirus-financial-resources

 

 

  1. Mayor announces grocery money for low income families https://durkan.seattle.gov/2020/03/mayor-jenny-durkan-announces-5-million-in-grocery-vouchers-for-families-impacted-by-covid-19/

 

 

  1. King County info about the coronavirus

(Translated in Amharic, Arabic, Chinese, Filipino/ Tagalog, French, Hindi, Japanese, Khmer, Korean, Marshallese, Russian, Somali, Spanish, Thai, Vietnamese)

https://kingcounty.gov/depts/health/communicable-diseases/disease-control/novel-coronavirus.aspx

 

 

  1. Free 2 months of internet

Effective Monday, March 16, 2020, Internet Essentials will increase speeds from 15/2 Mbps to 25/3 for all customers in response to emergency measures associated with Coronavirus (COVID-19). This speed increase will happen automatically – no action is required by customers. In addition, new customers will receive two months of free service. https://www.internetessentials.com/

 

  1. Utility discount program City of Seattle

https://www.seattle.gov/humanservices/services-and-programs/affordability-and-livability/utility-discount-program

 

Customers financially impacted by COVID 19 are urged to set up payment plans with either Seattle City Light or Seattle Public Utilities by calling 206-684-3000 or sending an email 24/7 at http://www.seattle.gov/utilities/about-us/email-question.

  1. Mayor stops evictions (temporarily)

Mayor Durkan signed an emergency order:  temporary moratorium on residential evictions, to keep Seattle families from losing their homes as a result of impacts from coronavirus.  This begins immediately in the City of Seattle for any residential eviction action related to the non-payment of rent. Tenants required to continue pay their rent if they are able and should work with their landlords on payment plans if they are experiencing financial hardship.

https://durkan.seattle.gov/2020/03/mayor-durkan-signs-emergency-order-to-halt-residential-evictions/

 

  1. Health insurance (those without insurance):

Washington State Health Benefit Exchange offers limited-time special enrollment period for qualified individuals who are currently without insurance.   The special enrollment period runs through April 8 and will allow uninsured individuals 30 days to enroll in health insurance coverage through Washington Heathplanfinder.

 

Until April 8, individuals seeking a special enrollment must contact the Customer Support Center between 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday-Friday at 1-855-923-4633; TTY: 1-855-627-9604, or a local certified broker or navigator.

https://www.wahbexchange.org/new-customers/who-can-sign-up/special-enrollment-period/

 

Supplemental Learning Resources

  1. SPS Supplemental Learning Resources:
    1. COVID-19 Resource page.
  2. Free education software subscriptions http://www.amazingeducationalresources.com/

 

  1. At Home Learning Resources Compiled by the Amazing Ms. B
Author, Book Resources  
Picture Books Read Alouds https://pernillesripp.com/2020/03/14/picture-books-read-aloud-videos-for-lesson-use/

 

Kate Messner Compiled videos https://www.katemessner.com/read-wonder-and-learn-favorite-authors-illustrators-share-resources-for-learning-anywhere-spring-2020/?fbclid=IwAR0UPWUxXN_xw4Erkm640zuDpAquBd_ZOBYBQvJyUXhDVDU9IhwlIeM_tCY

 

Lunch D oodles with Mo Willems kennedy-center.org/education/mo-willems

Click on the links to the activity page that goes with the lesson, too.

Authors on fb to follow There are many, these had recent announcements over the weekend.
Peter H. Reynolds Teachers: You have my permission to record & post videos of you reading any of my books for your students while your schools are temporarily closed.
TIP:Just pepper it with “socratic” comments so it’s not a straight read. ex. “What kind of mood is Vashti in?” : ) #readaloudalert

Chris Van Dusen

He will be reading his books regularly.

https://youtu.be/5ts8qckkNGc

https://youtu.be/R9UMzqv0CjA

Education Resources sites

 

GoNoodle

https://www.gonoodle.com/for-families/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2YBT7HYqCbbvzu3kKZ3wnw

Great Minds

Greatminds.org – Free starting March 18th

 

Resources for Learning at Home http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2020/03/15/resources-for-learning-at-home-while-were-keeping-each-other-safe/

Scholastic releases free daily courses for kids

https://classroommagazines.scholastic.com/support/learnathome.html

This resources is divided into 4 age group bands

Free Coloring Books from113 Museums http://www.openculture.com/2019/02/download-free-coloring-books-from-113-museums.html?fbclid=IwAR2Edf44cNzwzt-6O1I5gDAvzyNdMz4Cw_2SDsmreXRyaffdRKRN_K8D6rE
30 Virtual Field Trips  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1SvIdgTx9djKO6SjyvPDsoGlkgE3iExmi3qh2KRRku

_w/preview?fbclid=IwAR3XIWC5wEV6CH6C_TteiSVFEaI_HZjrJ6Jjzh_01OC0PiXGLMNCct9oYFw

Common Sense Media Compiled resources

http://view.commonsense-email.org/?qs=5651c92ff8ba28babcecae7fa77d679486a89fce790dd11f0cdb3b

3ee4d0cf5d13fe14c9541cbbe73aa4d9a5dec17586a9eb3f967174cb0777f6f8aad2bdb0a32436cfc03f495be

430834011f72584f0f562eac557f11246

 

 

  1. MORE At Home Learning Resources Compiled by the Amazing Ms. B
SPS Online Student Resources https://www.seattleschools.org/student_portal/online_student_resources

 

SPS Grade Level Resources https://www.seattleschools.org/district/calendars/news/what_s_new/

coronavirus_update/resources#learning

SPS Live content soon! Starting March 23rd there will be SPS TV programming broadcasted. More info to follow.
20 Virtual Field Trips https://adventuresinfamilyhood.com/20-virtual-field-trips-to-take-with-your-kids.html?fbclid=IwAR2CNC5eB2Mmejr2JYMGDHAByZGj8iTFM0ZN0Yb1YgWs

DSpkI4Rc7oHyEXU

ABC Mouse Use Code SCHOOL7771 https://www.abcmouse.com/abt/homepage

 

Abdo Books Resources for multiple age groups – needs QR reader to access https://abdobooks.com/covid-19-resources

 

Arts Ed Washington Free Art Lessons https://artsed-washington.github.io/alic/
Common Sense Media FREE Educator and Family Resources https://www.commonsense.org/education/coronavirus-resources?j=7704934&sfmc_sub=170457996&l=2048712_

HTML&u=143543081&mid=6409703&jb=661&utm_source=covid19

_landingpages_jim&utm_medium=email

Common Sense Media Family Resources – includes a Spanish section https://www.commonsensemedia.org/resources-for-families-during-the-coronavirus-pandemic?j=7704934&sfmc_sub=170457996&l=2048712_HTML&u=143543082&

mid=6409703&jb=661&utm_source=covid19_landingpages_jim&utm_medium=email

Draw Everyday with Jarrett J. Krosoczka—author & illustrator https://www.youtube.com/studiojjk
Grace Lin author You Tube page https://www.youtube.com/user/gracepacy
Kids Ask Authors podcasts https://www.kidsaskauthors.com/

Kids Submit a Book Review, short story, poem or joke!

https://www.kidsaskauthors.com/submit-a-book-review

Real Authors.   Real Illustrators.  Real time! Starting March 23rd  

https://www.stimolalive.com/

Scholastic: Explore the Science of Teen Sleep – Middle School Lesson

http://t.message.scholastic.com/nl/jsp/m.jsp?c=%40gDXYhpVzm2fDB8w

SwdhbIscm%2F%2FLzNX3J9dTcidaSTqE%3D&ET_CID=20200317_SNP_NIGM

S_68_TEST_V2_HeaderArt_Intro_SiteTest_PK1_ACQ_28349&ET_RID=1135609430

School Library Journals Compiled list of Free Tools for Online Teaching and Learning https://www.slj.com/?detailStory=free-resources-tools-for-online-teaching-and-learning-during-school-closures-COVID19-coronavirus
Spanish children’s stories https://www.thespanishexperiment.com/stories
Teaching Tolerance’s Digital Literacy Lessons https://www.tolerance.org/frameworks/digital-literacy?utm_source=Teaching+Tolerance&utm_campaign=87d5ba4b14-Newsletter+3-17-2020&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_a8cea027c3-87d5ba4b14-82974751

 

https://medium.com/pobble/simple-and-fun-non-screen-activities-that-children-can-do-at-home-115543cb3b9c?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=o&utm_campaign=non_screen&fbclid=IwAR3GbKjGDDGq0YcwH accessed 16 March 2020

 

https://www.kennedy-center.org/globalassets/education/education-landing-page/mo-willems/mokc_draw-pigeon_v1.pdf  accessed 16 March 2020

 

3-16-20 STEM K-8 Closure Update

Dear STEM K-8 Families:

I’m communicating today with little in the way of new information.  The disarray facing our families, community, country, and world is burrowing into hearts and minds.  Facing unprecedented circumstances, our values remain unchanged.  Figuring out what happens next requires an equity filter, and responding with compassion.

Today’s version of the Owl Post contains resources I shared via school messenger last Friday.  Seattle Public Schools is still working on guidance for staff on supporting equitable learning opportunities meet employee and family health precautions. Many staff sent resources directly to classroom communities, and you’re welcome to reach out to them directly.  Staff are checking email daily.

In the coming days we will learn more.  It’s an extraordinarily fluid situation, and public health and civic guidance changes daily.  As a nation we are slowly grasping the science and mathematics of the situation, and recognizing that we must be guided by what will be happening in three weeks, rather than today.  If you’re still trying to wrap your head around what that means, this Medium article that includes links to New York Times interactive graphs may interest you: Social Distancing, This is Not a Snow Day.

Socially distant is not the same thing as absent.  This is a community that knows how to support one another from at least 6 ft. away!

Take care,

Ben Ostrom

STEM K-8 Principal

3-13-20 STEM K-8 Closure Update and Resources

 

Dear STEM K-8 Families:

I hope this catches you remembering which way is up in this fast swirling current we have been swept in together.  We can predict that disorder, cancellations, and changes will continue, and for longer than we expect.  The size and pace of disruption are unprecedented in our lifetimes. It’s going to take exceptional levels of collective compassion and discipline to minimize the scale of disaster.

Seattle Public Schools and STEM staff are scrambling to pull together both supplemental learning and support resources for families. As we move forward they will evolve, and become more organized and prioritized.  I’ve pasted a long list of resources below as a start.

My thoughts are with you all. The bonds of community will continue to pull us through together.

Sincerely,

Ben Ostrom                                                                                              STEM Principal

 

 

Family Needs Survey

STEM K-8 support staff will work with families to locate services to address specific needs. Respond to this short survey to identify concerns or contributions your family is able to make.

STEM Family Needs Survey

 

Student Meal Support

Beginning Monday, March 16, SPS Nutrition Services staff will be distributing lunches from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. every weekday at 26 school sites throughout the city available for all SPS students. These 26 sites will become central locations for family and student resource distribution.

 

Internet Access

Comcast/Xfinity is offering free internet for eligible households for 60 days.

https://www.internetessentials.com/

 

Middle School Grades and Subjects:

A variety of assignments were sent home via email and posted on Schoology.

All students know how to log into Schoology.

 

Elementary Grades:

Supplementary assignments were sent home via email, posting to class blogs, and also some packets.

 

First Grade set up a Google drive with suggested activities: Google Drive: FIRST GRADE resources

 

 

Library Resources:

Mary Bannisters STEM Library Home Page:

Seattle Public Schools Online Resources

 

STEM Specialists:

We want to make sure you know that your child can access SPS resources at home! Student visit:  www.seattleschools.org. From there click the Student Family Portals link at the top of the screen, then select the Student Portal button in the middle of the screen (yes, student portal 2x).  From that screen they should log into CLEVER with their SPS username. John Adam Smith it would be1jasmith@seattleschools.org. Usernames are 1 followed by their first initial, middle initial, and last name (no spaces) and then @seattleschools.org. Students should know their password, they have been logging on with it at school; and at home it is the same.

 

From here they should be able to see the typing club and code.org icon – We highly recommend these. Both have self paced lessons students can do on their own (K-8); Code.org also has tutorials under Hour of Code for other options like Dance Party. Play Lab, and more. There are other resources on CLEVER as well such as Adobe Spark, Pebblo Go, and Tumble Books. Attached you will also find a menu of options from the STEM specialists for ways to continue learning at home. Mr. Holland, Mr. Avery, Mr. Schiavo, Mrs. Bannister, and myself put this together and hope that this gives you some ideas to keep practicing skills from our classes.

 

In addition to the resources available through CLEVER, we have also secured a subscription to Brain Pop for the duration of our closure; this includes Brain Pop Jr. and Brain Pop ELL. The username is stemowls and the password is owls2020

https://www.brainpop.com/

https://jr.brainpop.com/

https://ell.brainpop.com/

Each video comes with additional reading, a quiz, games, a worksheet, and a graphic organizer. This works on phones, tablets, and computers.

 

 

 

A Variety of Suggested Learning Activities and Resources Organized by Grade Bands

 

Suggested Learning Opportunities

 

Below are general learning opportunities for students and families to consider while away from school.

 

Preschool

 

Reading

 

  • Read a Book, Ask a Question – Make reading interactive, ask questions about the book that can be answered verbally or nonverbally.
  • Rhyme Time – Introduce rhyming words by reciting a rhyme or reading a rhyming book.
  • Picture Book – Create a picture book using magazine pictures, your children’s drawings or family photos. Encourage your child to share their ideas about the pictures and write down their words. Share the book and ask question as you read together.

 

Mathematics

 

  • Sorting – sort collections of items in your house by size, color and shapes. Items you can find include shells, buttons, rocks leaves.
  • Matching – sort and match laundry items.
  • Counting Collections – have your child count a collection of items you have in your house, such as buttons, toys, paper clips, etc.
  • Play card games
  • Homemade Floor Puzzle – use a piece of cardboard and have your child draw a picture. Cut the pieces into various shapes and sizes. Have child put pieces together.
  • Color Search – look for items that are a color match. Hold up a colored object and you’re your child go on a hunt around your house to find items that are the same color.
  • I Spy Shapes – look for items that are a shape match. Have child search for items in the house that are round, square, triangular, rectangular.

 

 

 

Grades K – 2

 

Reading

 

  • Have your student read a “just right” book daily for 15-30 minutes
  • Read aloud to your student and ask comprehension questions such as:
  • What are you picturing as you read/hear this text?
  • What are you wondering about?
  • What has happened so far? / What have you learned so far?
  • English Learners: Continue to speak, read and write in the language that is most comfortable at home.
  • Visit the SPS Online Resources page to access online books

https://www.seattleschools.org/cms/One.aspx?portalId=627&pageId=15858

  • PebbleGo for K-2 students

 

Writing

 

  • After reading a book or portion of a book, select one prompt to respond to:
    • Write about what happened in the story.
    • Write about your favorite part and tell why you selected that part.
    • Write about what might happen next in the story.
    • Write a story.

 

Mathematics

 

This is a great time to share with your student that math is everywhere. K-2 students should spend 10 minutes/day for math games and/or workbook practice.

 

  • Count Everything: Counting is a powerful activity that students can do anywhere.
  • Count in different ways, by 2’s, 5’s, 10’s. Start counting from different numbers, not just at zero.  Celebrate landmark numbers – Clap or jump when you get to multiples of 10 like 10, 20, 30 etc.
  • Play store! Count while you stock shelves or exchange and count pretend money.
  • Talk about Shapes: Find, classify and sort shapes in your home. How many circles can you find, how many rectangles – and how many of those are squares.
  • Measure everything. Use nonstandard tools like a shoe or even your hand to measure how tall a table is or how far you can jump.
  • Point out fractions – share things – like a can of soup – between people. Each person gets a 1/2 or 1/3. Note how this new kind of number is less than one but more than none!
  • Read Stories! Mathematize reading time. Most children’s books are ripe with opportunities to notice shapes, count objects, compare two things, notice how things change and grow, and to make predictions about what is going to happen based on the information we already have!
  • Look at coins and determine how old they are using the date. Sort them from oldest to newest coin. If you have a large collection of coins arrange them into a bar graph based on year or the location, they were minted. What is the most common date or location?

 

Science

 

  • Go outside and make observations. Look for evidence of animal habitats (i.e.: spider webs, bird nests, animal tracks, or leaves with insect bite marks, etc.)
  • Look for evidence of spring in the plants (i.e.: flowers, buds, new leaves, etc.)
  • Collect rocks or leaves from outside and let students think of creative ways to put the objects into groups. (i.e.: size, color, shape, texture) Ask students to explain why they chose the grouping they chose.

 

 

 

Grades 3 – 5

 

Reading

 

  • Have your student read a “just right” book daily for 15-30 minutes
  • Read aloud to your student and ask comprehension questions such as:
  • What are you picturing as you read/hear this text?
  • What are you wondering about?
  • What has happened so far? / What have you learned so far?
  • English Learners: Continue to speak, read and write in the language that is most comfortable at home.
  • Visit the SPS Online Resources page to access online books

https://www.seattleschools.org/cms/One.aspx?portalId=627&pageId=15858

  • TumbleBooks for K-5 students

 

Writing

 

  • After reading a book or portion of a book, select one prompt to respond to:
    • Write about what happened in the story.
    • Write about your favorite part and tell why you selected that part.
    • Write about what might happen next in the story.
    • Write a story.

 

Mathematics

 

This is a great time to share that with your student that math is everywhere. Grade 3-5 students should spend 10 minutes/day for math games and/or workbook practice.

 

  • Measure, count, and record. Count how many jumping jacks or pushups can be done and how long it takes – or how long it takes to do 10 or 20. Play around with doubling or halving the time. Use non-standard tools, like a shoe, to count how far someone can jump – calculate how far 10, 15, or 20 jumps might take you.
  • Build something together. Big or small, any project that involves measuring includes counting, adding, and multiplying. It doesn’t matter whether you’re making a clubhouse out of shoeboxes or building a genuine tree house.
  • Involve your student in the shopping. Talk about prices as you shop and estimate the cost by rounding to friendly numbers or use a calculator for more accuracy.
  • Look at coins and determine how old they are using the date. Sort them from oldest to newest coin. Find the sum of their ages.  Find the difference between the oldest and the newest.  If you have a large collection of coins arrange them into a bar graph based on year or location where they were minted.  What is the most or least common year or location?
  • Count things and generalize to larger sets. Count how many beans are in one cup and estimate how many are in a larger bag.  Count how many students are in their class and estimate how many students are home from their school or from the school district.
  • Mathematize reading time. Most children’s books are ripe with opportunities to notice shapes, count objects, compare two things, notice how things change and grow, and to make predictions about what is going to happen based on the information we already have!

 

Science

 

  • Keep a “Spring Changes” journal by making daily observations of the weather, plants, and animal changes that occur as the spring approaches. Draw pictures and write about what evidence you see of the coming spring season. Record the questions you have.
  • Using household items, design and build the tallest free-standing structure you can build.

 

 

Grades 6 – 8

 

Reading

 

  • Suggested reading time for middle school students is 30-45 minutes a day.
  • Questions to consider while you read:
    • What questions do you have about the text?
    • What inferences and/or predictions are you making as you read?
    • What connections do you have to the text?
  • English Learners: Continue to speak, read and write in the language that is most comfortable at home.

 

Writing

 

Below are questions to consider during and after reading. Remember to use text evidence to support your responses.

  • What is the main idea or theme?
  • Who is the intended audience? How do you know?
  • How is the text structured or organized?
  • What is your connection to the text?
  • What is the author’s purpose and/or message?

 

Mathematics

 

enVision workbooks should be taken home, if possible.  Students may or may not be asked to bring these resources with them when they return to school. Middle school students should spend 30 minutes/day for math review and games.

 

  • Teachers should advise students what unit they are currently in and the pages they can work through.
  • Pages from prior units can be used to review content/stay fresh, including Mid-Topic CheckPoints, End of Topic Reviews, and Review What You Knows.

 

Game: 1-2 Nim

  • Instructions: Nim is a two-player game. Start with a pile of 10 counters (paper clips, dried pasta, coins, etc.). On your turn, remove one or two counters from the pile. You must take at least one counter on your turn, but you may not take more than two. Whoever takes the last counter wins.

 

  • Example Game: Start with 10 counters in the pile. Player A takes 2 counters, leaving 8. Player B takes one counter, leaving 7. Player A takes two counters, leaving 5. Player B takes one counter, leaving 4. Player A takes one counter, leaving 3. Player B takes one counter, leaving 2. Player A takes two counters, leaving 0 and winning the game.
  • After you play several games, start the conversation around the question, “How do you win?” Record data for different variations (starting with 1 counter, 2 counters, 3 counters, etc.) and see if you can figure out a strategy to always win.

 

Game: Pig

Pig is a game for 2 to 6 players. Players take turns rolling a die as many times as they like. If a roll is a 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6, the player adds that many points to their score for the turn. A player may choose to end their turn at any time and “bank” their points. If a player rolls a 1, they lose all their unbanked points and their turn is over.

  • Beginner Game: The first player to score 50 or more points wins.
  • Advanced Game: The first player to score 100 or more points wins.

 

Project: Where do I see math?

  • Have students consider the math they have done in middle school. Examples might be fractions, percent, ratios, solving proportions, proportional relationships, linear relationships, geometry, or any others. Have them record (pictures, video, drawing) places in their homes, or neighborhoods where they see this math happening. Have them write math problems about the math they see!

 

Science

 

  • Read a news source on the coronavirus daily.
    • Research the validity of the claims using expert sources, such as the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), to identify inconsistencies.
    • Based on your readings, why does the CDC recommend you wash your hands for 20 seconds and not touch your eyes and nose?

 

 

All Grades

 

Physical Education

 

Children and adolescents ages 6 through 17 years should do 60 minutes (one hour) or more of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity daily. It is important to provide young people opportunities and encouragement to participate in physical activities that are appropriate for their age, that are enjoyable, and that offer variety.

  • Aerobic: Most of the 60 minutes or more per day should be either moderate- or vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity and should include vigorous-intensity physical activity on at least 3 days a week. Some aerobic activities include brisk walking, running, climbing stairs, jumping jacks, playing basketball, and dancing.
  • Muscle-strengthening: As part of their 60 minutes or more of daily physical activity, children and adolescents should include muscle-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days a week. Some muscle-strengthening includes squats, leg lifts, and sit-ups.
  • Bone-strengthening: As part of their 60 minutes or more of daily physical activity, children and adolescents should include bone-strengthening physical activity on at least 3 days a week. Some bone-strengthening activities include push-ups, push-ups against a wall, and jumping.

 

A single session of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity can reduce blood pressure, improve insulin sensitivity, improve sleep, reduce anxiety symptoms, and improve some aspects of cognition on the day that it is performed. Most of these improvements become even larger with the regular performance of moderate-to vigorous physical activity. Other benefits, such as disease risk reduction and improved physical function, accrue within days to weeks after consistently being more physically active

 

Resources for Physical Activity Boosts:

 

 

 

Resources for K-12 Learning

 

Student Online Resources

 

Visit the SPS Online Resources page to access online books

https://www.seattleschools.org/cms/One.aspx?portalId=627&pageId=15858

  • PebbleGo for K-2 students
  • TumbleBooks for K-5 students

 

Schoology

 

The following information is intended to communicate possible ways the Schoology Learning Management System (LMS) can used by SPS teachers to support students who are absent from school. Please consider our recommendations as suggestions for best practice. For your convenience the links to internal/external resources are provided.

 

SPS teachers use Schoology in many ways to support student learning:

  • Posting assignments
  • Administering quizzes, entry tasks, and exit tickets
  • Extending student discussions
  • Hosting documents
  • Communicating important calendar events and due dates

 

Students use the Student Portal, (Clever) to access Schoology from home,

https://seattleschools.sharepoint.com/:b:/s/communities/dots/insttechnology/ESPYaGOjvUpBjXjfx6SRwX0BuCs0VnnbxMXwEjq-OV8TVQ?e=jknpJh.

 

Families use the Schoology Registration Steps on the SPS website to set up their Schoology parent accounts,

https://www.seattleschools.org/cms/one.aspx?portalId=627&pageId=999612.

 

Additionally, Schoology’s Help Center hosts everything students, teachers, and leadership need to know about Schoology, https://support.schoology.com/hc/en-us/articles/206621517-Getting-Started-on-Schoology-For-Instructors.

 

 

Seattle Public Library

 

 

 

Additional Free At-Home Learning Resources:

 

Free At-Home Learning Resources
Literacy Mathematics
 

Scholastic Learn At Home

  • Free online resource
  • No login required
  • Includes vocabulary, text with audio option, and additional activities to “Continue the Learning Journey.”

Instructions:

1.    Go to Scholastic Learn At Home

2.    Scroll down to select your grade level

3.    Begin on Day 1!

4.    Ask your child questions about what they learned.

 

 

 

 

 

Council for the Great City Schools Parent Roadmaps to CCSS (ELA) These parent roadmaps for each grade level  provide three-year snapshots showing how selected standards progress from year to year so that students will be college and career ready upon their graduation from high school. Available in English and Spanish.

https://www.cgcs.org/Page/328#:~:text=

Math For Love

  • Goals include providing opportunities to enjoy mathematics and improving student conceptual understanding while exercising skills and fluency.
  • Includes lesson plans and Math games

Instructions:

1.    Select the appropriate grade level to download the PDF packet:

Math For Love Kindergarten

Math For Love Grades 1 & 2

Math For Love Grades 3 & 4

2.    Some games may require additional materials that are not provided.

 

 

Council for the Great City Schools Parent Roadmaps to CCSS (Math) These parent roadmaps for each grade level  provide three-year snapshots showing how selected standards progress from year to year so that students will be college and career ready upon their graduation from high school. Available in English and Spanish.

https://www.cgcs.org/Page/244

 

 

Common Sense Media Recommendations for Entertainment

Age-appropriate media suggestions to keep the whole family engaged.

Resources for at-home learning
Tools to help parents and caregivers keep kids focused and learning at home.

Stress-management resources

 

Facing the Novel Coronavirus Challenge together

3-12-20

Dear STEM K-8 Families:

We are living through an uncertain, stressful period that will not see improvement in the short run.  We don’t have prior experiences to fall back on.  We depend upon the wisdom and science of health experts, and must lean on the strength of our community — while somehow maintaining social distance!

The closure of schools for a minimum of 14 days given epidemiology could well stretch longer.  It was a hard choice necessary to slow down the spread of Coronavirus, but will clearly impact the whole community, especially working and vulnerable families. SPS will provide more information on implementing emergency food supports by Friday, 3/13.

When basic needs and well-being are at risk, community values and connections become clear. Take care of one other. Reach out to the people around you (but don’t shake their hands or gather in small spaces) and support those in need. Now is the time to demonstrate our love and commitment, and use the amazing creativity, commitment, and skills in our community to get through this worn down but stronger!

Seattle Public Schools will continue to coordinate with state and local officials, and partners as we come together to combat COVID-19 and support one another.  Information will be communicated regularly via email and the SPS Coronavirus 2019 Update webpage.

It was unfortunate timing that Wednesday’s early release was targeted to plan activities for students in the event of school closure.  Many grade levels were able to pull some things together before students went home.  I am consolidating resources teachers shared and a few others, and will send them out via school messenger tomorrow.

Some Coronavirus resources that have been shared previously:

Resources

Seattle Public Schools COVID-19 FAQ

Seattle Public Schools Letter and Video Archive with Transcript Translation

King County, Washington State, and National Health Resources

The Washington State Department of Health has established a call center to address questions from the public. If you have questions about what is happening in Washington, or how the virus is spread, please call 1-800-525-0127.

Phone lines are currently staffed from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m, seven days a week. Please note that this call center can not access COVID-19 testing results. For testing inquiries or results, please contact your health care provider.

STEM K-8 may be closed but it’s not gone.  Thanks for your commitment to one another!

 

Ben Ostrom

STEM K-8 Principal

 

 

 

 

 

3-9-20 STEM K-8 Owl Post Update

Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to play a trump card in our daily lives. The health and economic worries are real.  Compassion and care for one another, and following basic health guidelines are vital.  Community bonds are tested and built at the same time.  Thanks to the many families, staff and others who are stepping up to help in and out of schools!

 Seattle Public Schools (SPS) is in close contact and following the guidance of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Public Health Seattle.  Please read the daily communication from Seattle Public Schools for updates on an evolving situation

Some of the reasons that schools remain open are continuing to provide educational services, maintaining an access point to critical meals, social services, and child care for thousands of students and families, supporting front-line health care providers and workers, and that most confirmed novel coronavirus cases have occurred in adults, with serious illness in children uncommon.

School events and field trips are being canceled at the current time.  Pie Night devotees will have to recite their irrational digits at home. Families can help by staying informed, practicing good hygiene, and staying home or keeping children home if they have been running a fever or are exhibiting signs of a fever. For additional resources visit Seattle Public Schools coronavirus news announcements. SPS will continue to update families via social media, its website, and school messenger.

Two reoccurring less serious concerns involve students calling and texting parents from school on cell phones and student pick up.  Since student phones are supposed to be up during the day, please remind your child if they call or text during the day to put their phone up and if it’s urgent call from the office.  If a student is sick and has been checked by a staff member we will call you to pick them up!  Also, if you are picking up your child early, please check in and we will call them down to the office.  This supports a standard safety procedure of verifying identities before releasing children.

Let’s continue to look out for one another!

Ben Ostrom, Principal

 

March 3 STEM K-8 Owl Post Update

Never a dull moment at Louisa Boren STEM K-8.  STEM hosted the WA Vex IQ State Tournament on Saturday!  We had two students participating–tournament qualifiers Oliver and Reese.  There were over 80 teams, hundreds of fans,  and schools from all around WA state.   Thanks to coaches McGavick and Schmick, Team Coordinator Cynthia Moon, and the many other parent volunteers who made it happen.  Plus team members and student volunteers Finn, Estelle, Jane, Ryan, Beckett, Jackson, and Leo!  It’s the first time the tournament has been held on the east side of the state.

The big news of course is Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)’s appearance in Seattle. Seattle Public Schools (SPS) follows the guidance of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Public Health Seattle & King County in our response to COVID-19Currently there are no confirmed cases of coronavirus in SPS. District staff are continuing to monitor the situation to protect our students and staff.

Families can help by staying informed, practicing good hygiene, and staying home or keeping children home if they have been running a fever or are exhibiting signs of a fever. For additional resources visit Seattle Public Schools coronavirus news announcements. SPS will continue to update families via social media, its website, and school messenger.

STEM K-8 will undoubtedly going to feel some impacts from COVID-19. At a minimum we are going to experience more challenges with unfilled vacancies as  everyone takes greater health precautions.  A Novel Coronavirus fact sheet is linked here and included in the Owl Post.

Thursday, March 5, from 6:30-8:00 is our monthly general PTA meeting.  STEM families will have an opportunity to preview and provide feedback on STEM K-8’s budget and staffing plan for the 2020-21 school year.  Childcare is provided.